Fitzmaurice’s practice is grounded in a process of roaming and observation, appropriating existing languages, focusing on the overlooked and the ubiquitous. His work looks at the world we have designed for, and around, ourselves often focusing on the essential characteristic of symmetry, both in the objects we design, and our relations to them. By using found and discarded objects, Fitzmaurice situates his work around issues of consumerism and the consequences of mass production on our lives. Previous bodies of works have utilised found Coke cans, plastic shopping bags, discarded cigarette packets and advertising flyers, all items with an inherent disposability and devastating permanence when it comes to the environment. 

 

 

Leo Fitzmaurice b. 1963 Newport, England. Lives and works in Merseyside.
Solo exhibitions include: 
Enjoy Civic Life, Humber Street Gallery, Hull, UK, 2020, Between You and Me and Everything Else, The Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, UK, 2018, As Yet, Caustic Coastal, Manchester, UK, 2017, OH V HO, The Sunday Painter, London, UK, 2016, Frieze London Sculpture Park, 2015, /|\, The Sunday Painter, London 2014, Blank Stir, The Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool, UK, 2012, You Try to Tell Me But I never Listen, New Art Gallery Walsall, 2011, Sometimes the Things You Touch Come True, Yorkshire Sculpture Park 2007, Neat Stuff , First-site Colchester 2005. Group exhibitions include Sculpture In the City, London, UK, 2019, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, UK, 2016, Reader, Gether Contemporary, Copenhagen, 2016, Edit/Undo, Space In Between, London, 2015, Easy Does It (Curated by Kevin Hunt), David Dale Gallery, Glasgow, 2014, Chain Chain Chain (curated by Glenn Adamson), Bischoff Weiss, London, 2012, The way we do art now, curated by Pavel Buchler, Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin, 2010, Flyerssheepflagshelf, Seventeen Gallery, London, 2010. Fitzmaurice was the recipient of the 5th Northern Art Prize in 2012. Fitzmaurice’s work is in the Arts Council Collection of England, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Manchester Art Gallery, The Royal London Hospital (Vital Arts), The Locus Plus Archive and numerous private collections.